Beyond Systems

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What I’m Doing in 2020

Looking at the medical literature to see whether having agency (A) and a sense of belonging (B) can change (C) the odds on health

Pay Attention to the Surprises

How unearthing and unleashing the surprises in ‘community health’ work is crucial to the field – but rarely done well or systematically (and goodbye for now)

Solving Through Relationships, Not Transaction

A conversation with Chris Dabbs on how Unlimited Potential has walked the line between serving community residents and serving commissioners

Not Sentimentalizing Community

How understanding the flow of care made possible by social cohesion is fundamental – and may need more ruthless employers

Exploring the Nuance Under the Buzz

How looking underneath buzz terms like ‘deaths of despair’ and ‘asset-based community development’ is key to finding solutions

When Trust Is Not Enough

A conversation with Graham Duncan about building confidence and hope amongst marginalised populations – and the psychological processes underpinning it

On Power, Co-Production and Feeling Overwhelmed

How co-production, self-management and health promotion all have the potential to increase social inequity, and what you can do about it

Why Provision is not Enough

How atomising problems and providing programmes ignores what really matters in enabling people to turn their lives around

Halfway Between a Stranger and a Friend

A conversation with Maff Potts on how 20 years working at the sharp end of society has taught it him that only two things matter, and what he’s doing about it

Sectors, Partnering and Place

How cross-sector partnering demands thinking about place, and why thinking about place means thinking about people’s choices and freedom

Lessons from the Frontline of Cross-Sector Partnering

A conversation with David Relph, formerly of Bristol Health Partners, on why collaboration has to be the core purpose of institutions concerned with health

On Absurdity, Collusion and Silence

How our failure to effectively respond to non-communicable diseases may be because our science needs updating – if only our politics would get out of the way
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